Appalachian State University Historical Photographs


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For questions about the ASU Historical Photographs, please contact Pam Mitchem.

pricemtchemp@appstate.edu

Phone: 828.262.7422

 


Appalachian State University Historical Timelines
General Events: 1970-1979

 

1970: Demerit system abolished in favor of a Student Conduct Code.

1970: In January, 300 residents of Hoey Hall sign a petition refusing to elect hall monitors, responsible for the nightly room checks, and elected monitors resign in protest for being elected against their wills.  A no-room-check policy is instituted in women’s dorms.

1970: Singer Jose Feliciano performs at Varsity Gymnasium in January.

1970: The Platters and Temptations perform at Appalachian State in February.

1970: A trial run of a no-curfew women’s dorm is planned for the 1970-71 school year, but is canceled due to lack of applications.

1970: Four businesses on King Street, the Gateway restaurant, A and R Food Store, the Sanitary Barber Shop, and a carpet shop, are destroyed by fire on February 18.

1970: The President of the Student Body and chair of Faculty Senate are added to Board of Trustees.

1970: In March, Appalachian students Kathy Rogers and Sharon McDonald found Elizabeth Cady Stanton chapter of the Women’s Liberation Front

1970: In April, Appalachian State holds an all-day symposium on U. S. foreign policy in Asia, sponsored by the University Public Programs Committee.

1970: Inspection of women's dormitory rooms for neatness is changed from once per week to once per month ("for fire and health hazard only")

1970: In April, an Environmental teach-in is held, including graveside services for a car engine, buried near the soccer field.

1970: On May 12, campus holds a memorial for students killed at Kent State and Jackson State College. It is followed on May 14 by a SGA student forum on Sanford Mall to discuss opinions on Vietnam, the invasion of Cambodia, the Kent State shootings, and student dissent.

1970: Campus approves a no-curfew policy for upperclass women, but retains restrictions on freshmen. The policy goes into effect Fall 1970. However, the doors to the residence halls are locked after midnight and students wishing to gain entry have to contact a security officer.

1970: Campus post office is made an official contract station of the United States Postal Service.

1970: In May, air conditioning is installed in two faculty lounges and offices in Edwin Duncan Hall. Classrooms and offices with exterior windows are not air conditioned.

1970: The football field and track at Conrad Stadium are fitted with artificial turf and an all-weather artificial track surface.

1970: The Geography Department offers green food stamps as a bonus to students signing up for geography electives during registration for the fall semester .

1970: Student Senate approves Appalachian State’s first social fraternity, Pi Kappa, in October. The fraternity does not receive approval from the administration.

1970: Appalachian Black Cultural Organization forms in the spring.

1970: Journalist James Kilpatrick and two NASA scientists speak at Appalachian State in October.

1970: On November 5, Jane Fonda speaks at Appalachian State on Vietnam as part of the Artists and Lecture Series.

1970: University’s outdoor shooting range opens for use for the ROTC rifle team and other student and faculty groups.

1970: Steppenwolf performs in Varsity Gym in November.

1970: University leases a UNIVAC 9400 for the Computer Center.

1970: NOW founder Betty Friedan speaks on ASU campus in December.

1970: Faculty Senate votes to abolish textbook rental system in December. In April 1971, President Wey rejects this decision and maintains the bookstore’s rental system.

1971: Allman Brothers perform in January.

1971: A branch of Northwestern Bank moves into the second floor of the University Bookstore.

1971: Guess Who performs in Varsity Gym in March.

1971: Paul Anderson, "the world’s strongest man," speaks during Spring Rally in April.

1971: Peace protesters hold moratorium on Sanford Mall in May. Sponsored by Students for Action, between 200 and 400 students participate.

1971: Student Government and the Popular Programs Committee sponsor a May Day Play Day with a New Orleans' Bourbon Street theme.

1971: Biology Department museum opens in Rankin Hall in May.

1971: In May, members of Alpha Phi Omega march along HWY 421 to Winston-Salem to raise funds for a kidney transplant for member Jack Young, raising approximately $7,000.

1971: Biology Department discovers Native American remains in Valle Crucis in June.

1971: Mountaineer Playhouse (summer theatre) forms.

1971: In July, the Department of Industrial Arts raises a "25-foot-tall totem pole constructed in the department’s woodworking class in front of Kerr Scott Hall.

1971: Student Typesetting Service opens.

1971: Kenny Rogers performs during Homecoming.

1971: Students hold rally in support of visitation in women’s dorm rooms on Sanford Mall. An estimated two thousand students participate.

1971: Appalachian State University becomes part of newly created University of North Carolina System; Herbert Wey becomes first chancellor.

1971: Boone chapter of the ACLU forms in December.

1972: Alpha Phi Omega walks to Charlotte to raise funds for Sue Buchanan, who recently received a kidney transplant. The walk raised $1,000 towards the $15,000 surgery.

1972: Chancellor Wey dismisses rumors that Appalachian State will change its name to UNC-Boone.

1972: Freshmen women are allowed the same curfew privileges as upperclass women. Curfew policies now allow freshmen to leave their dorms before curfew and are not required to return, but are not allowed to leave after curfew.

1972: Appalachian Food Services expands the Gold Room and installs an ice cream parlor in Plemmons Student Union in September.

1972: Daniel Ellsberg, responsible for the publication of the Pentagon Papers, and Ralph Nader are scheduled to speak at Appalachian State as part of the Artists and Lecture Series. Ellsberg had to cancel due to the re-opening of his trial.

1972: Water shortage in Boone results in the city borrowing six million gallons from the Appalachian State water system, which includes 5 400-foot deep wells and a spring on Howard’s Knob.

1972: Student Senate appoints freshman Judy Gentry to the Homecoming Court. Gentry was the first African-American woman to be on any court at Appalachian State and was appointed to provide representation for the African-American students on campus.

1972: Human Sexuality Day is held on October 25, and includes discussion groups, information booths, panels, films and special talks.

1972: Student Senate asks administration for two day academic moratorium to allow students to return home for campaigning and voting in the November election.

1972: Beach Boys perform in November.

1973: James Dickey, author of Deliverance, speaks at Appalachian State in March.

1972: First Greek fraternity and sorority are approved at Appalachian State.

1972: In February, seven men register as candidates for May Queen in protest of the discrimination of minorities and Student Government sponsored beauty pageants. SGA soon withdraws its sponsorship of May and Winter courts.

1972: Preservation Hall Jazz Band performs at the Appalachian Elementary School auditorium in February.

1972: A fire destroys the main dining hall and an adjacent sleeping cabin at Camp Broadstone in February. The fire was caused by the explosion of one of the heating units in the dining hall.

1972: Roller Derby and the National Opera Company perform at Appalachian State in March.

1972: U. S. Department of Interior donates a sea lion to the biology department for dissection and study.

1972: WASU-FM begins broadcasting.

1972: The Computer Center’s UNIVAC assigns student dormitory rooms for 1972-73. Students are warned to be especially careful when filling out application forms, including four copies of the application, a questionnaire, and two copies of the housing contract.

1972: Watauga County Sheriff’s Department cancels a spring dance sponsored by Pi Kappa in the Boone Moose Lodge over issues concerning potential alcoholic beverages at a public event in a dry county.

1972: Appalachian Outward Bound Program is offered for first time during the summer.

1972: Office of Outdoor Programs is created.

1972: In April, the SGA urges Appalachian students to boycott classes in conjunction with a nation-wide boycott sponsored by the National Student Association and National Student Lobby, to protest the escalation of the air-war in Vietnam. The event is canceled due to rain.

1972: Activist Dick Gregory speaks at Appalachian State in April.

1972: The Black Culture Center, under construction by Appalachian Black Culture Organization in East Hall, is vandalized in April.

1972: Permit system goes into effect for hikers in the Linville Gorge.

1972: Appalachian Black Culture Organization holds a Black Culture Expo to promote understanding of African-American culture in May.

1972: Appalachian State switches PBX switchboard to the Centrex system.

1972: In September, private phones are installed in dormitories for the first time for an estimated 2100 students. Phones are placed in every dorm room in Cone, Cannon, Hoey, Gardner, Coltrane, Bowie, and Eggers Halls. Students are charged $10 a quarter for local telephone service.

1972: Alpha Phi Omega walks to Charlotte to raise funds for Sue Buchanan, who recently received a kidney transplant. The walk raised $1,000 towards the $15,000 surgery.

1972: Chancellor Wey dismisses rumors that Appalachian State will change its name to UNC-Boone.

1972: Freshmen women are allowed the same curfew privileges as upperclass women. Curfew policies now allow freshmen to leave their dorms before curfew and are not required to return, but are not allowed to leave after curfew.

1972: Appalachian Food Services expands the Gold Room and installs an ice cream parlor in Plemmons Student Union in September.

1972: Watauga College starts.

1972: Daniel Ellsberg, responsible for the publication of the Pentagon Papers, and Ralph Nader are scheduled to speak at Appalachian State as part of the Artists and Lecture Series. Ellsberg had to cancel due to the re-opening of his trial.

1972: Water shortage in Boone results in the city borrowing six million gallons from the Appalachian State water system, which includes 5 400-foot deep wells and a spring on Howard’s Knob.

1972: Student Senate appoints freshman Judy Gentry to the Homecoming Court. Gentry was the first African-American woman to be on any court at Appalachian State and was appointed to provide representation for the African-American students on campus.

1972: Human Sexuality Day is held on October 25, and includes discussion groups, information booths, panels, films and special talks.

1972: Student Senate asks the Administration for two day academic moratorium to allow students to return home to vote in the November election. While not canceling classes, the Faculty Senate asks faculty not to place any academic impediments to students wishing to return home during those two days.

1972: Beach Boys perform in November.

1973: James Dickey, author of Deliverance, speaks at Appalachian State in March.

1973: Broyhill Inn and Conference Center opens.

1973: A stretch of US HWY-321 one mile south of Blowing Rock caves-in after three days of rainfall in March. The road was expected to be out of commission for three to four months while construction crews carved a new road out of the mountainside. Until a temporary road was constructed, traffic between Lenoir and Blowing Rock was diverted through North Wilkesboro.

1973: Plemmons Student Center is officially changed to Plemmons Student Union in March.

1973: A fire damages the top floor of nearly-completed Mountaineer Apartments in March.

1973: In protest of the inflationary prices of meat, students boycott meat for one week in March.

1973: Dr. Ulysses Kay serves as composer-in-residence for the Contemporary Music Festival in April.

1973: Blues Artist Albert King performs in Varsity Gym in April.

1973: Cherokee teacher Michael Crowe speaks at Smith-Wright Hall on Native American discrimination on May 11.

1973: A Driver Education Course is built next to Edwin Duncan Hall in June.

1973: Price of a cheeseburger in the Bavarian Inn is 50¢.

1973: Blood, Sweat, and Tears performs at Homecoming.

1973: The SCEC sponsors a womanless beauty contest in October. Nine men compete dressed as women, and are judged on talent, poise, and originality.

1973: ALBION published by the History Department.

1973: Kraut (Boone) Creek floods on Memorial Day.

1973: Smoke Stack is removed from power plant when power source is converted from coal to oil.

1973-74: Instate tuition and fees reach $151.91 per term; out of state tuition and fees reach $685.25. Housing costs men an addition $315.00 and women $280.00.

1974: Singer Earl Scruggs and jazz musician Count Bassie perform at Appalachian State in January.

1974: Students pay $12 a year for on-campus parking. It is later reduced to $9.

1974: In February, students hold a “streak festival” on Sanford Mall, attended by approximately 150 to 500 students, which lasted from 9 pm to 10:30 pm. One person is reported to have streaked.

1974: Three pay phones are installed on campus on January 31.

1974: Cold Mountain Review begins publication in May.

1974: Astronaut Charles Duke speaks at Appalachian State in January.

1974: Black Student Association founded at Appalachian State.

1974: WASU-TV is started by Learning Resources and the Department of Speech.

1974: Author Jesse Jackson becomes practitioner-in-residence for the College of Education.

1974: The Loft in New York City, New York, is opened and operated by the Art Department.

1974: Women’s Resource Center opens.

1974: The Student Transit Service starts on January 9, 1974, using a renovated 1959 school bus. The STS transports ASU students around campus and to selected locations in Boone and eventually Blowing Rock. Despite increasing popularity, the STS ceases operation in April due to severe gas shortage in Boone.

1974: Anthropologist Margaret Mead speaks at Appalachian State in September.

1974: Faculty Senate calls for a ban on smoking in classrooms.

1974: A second bus service by the newly formed Community Transit Authority begins in December for Boone residents and ASU students. Trips cost 25¢ per passenger. Service ceases operation in February 1975 due to lack of support.

1974: Flick, a local movie theater, reduces admission prices from $1.75 to $1 for adults in an effort to attract audiences.

1974: The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is passed by Congress to ensure the privacy of student records.

1976: Counseling Center forms a support group for homosexual students on campus.

1975: Sammy Davis, Jr., performs at Varsity Gymnasium.

1975: Belk Library installs security detection system to prevent the illegal removal of books. Previously every student leaving the library was searched for unchecked library books. The system included a security gate that locked when the sensors were activated, preventing the student from leaving the library.

1975: Warren Wilson Cooperative Project begins.

1975: In April, the Watauga County tax supervisor rules Appalachian State students must report personal belongings within Watauga County valued at more than $300 for tax purposes. The current County tax is 65¢ on every $100, with an additional 50¢ for every $100 in the city of Boone.

1975: Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Norman Dello Joio appears as guest artist at Appalachian State during the sixth annual Contemporary Music Festival in April.

1975: Author and poet Robert Penn Warren speaks at Appalachian State in March.

1975: Vernician Literary Society becomes the Zeta Mu chapter of the Alpha Delta Pi Sorority.

1975: The Computer Center adds a UNIVAC Spectra 70/46, worth an estimated one million dollars.

1975: In protest of the Watauga County property tax ruling, approximately 100 students march to the Boone Court House and attempt to register to vote. Only four students are allowed to register. Student Government appeals to the ACLU over discrimination, as students were rejected based on amount of community involvement and lack of financial independence as well as residence issues, despite being taxed by Watauga County.

1975: The Computer Center rents a UNIVAC 90/60 to ease the workload on the UNIVAC 70-46. The 90/60 costs $20,000 a month to operate and has a memory capacity of 524 KB.

1975: Doris Foxworth is elected "Miss Black Culture" during Black Expo Week in October. Miss Black Culture was then to participate in the Miss ASU contest in November.

1975: The Czechoslovakian Panocha String Quartet performs at the I. G. Greer Auditorium in November.

1976: The SGA holds a New River Festival to raise awareness for the environmental and agricultural damage that would result from the proposed buildnig of a second dam on the New River.

1976: In January, approximately 50 students participate in a “dirty laundry” sit in, wherein students carried pillowcases of dirty laundry to the Office of Student Housing in protests of unsatisfactory campus laundry services. Campus Laundry Services ends the required $45 laundry fee in the fall.

1976: Professor Dan Stillwell of the Department of Geography builds a 150-pound one eight-millionth scale model of the Earth.

1976: Bruce Springsteen performs at Appalachian State in April.

1976: Appalachian State’s Women’s Studies Program is founded

1976: Gene Roddenbery speaks at Farthing Auditorium in May.

1976: Phones are installed in dorm rooms in Watauga, Justice, Newland, and East Residence Halls.

1976: Jimmy Buffet, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, and Jerry Jeff Walker perform in September-October in Farthing Auditorium.

1977: Boone Spring Cleanup Project is held by Appalachian State student and Boone organizations in April.

1977: Alpha Epsilon Rho, the National Honorary Broadcasting Society, opens a chapter at Appalachian State in April.

1977: Lack of dorm space and apartment vacancies results in Housing officials placing students in hotels and motels around Boone for the Fall semester.

1977: Billy Joel performs at Appalachian State during Homecoming.

1977: Appalachian House in Washington, D.C., is opened.

1978: Chancellor Wey issues moratorium banning non-service dogs from University buildings and the cafeteria, and beginning the enforcement of leash laws. The ban was aimed at stray dogs and unleashed pets that had been roaming campus buildings, the cafeteria dining area, and the campus grounds.

1978: The Appalachian reports a jock raid accomplished by women students on April 11

1978: Gas prices in Boone are 60¢ a gallon.

1978: Six African-American Appalachian State students and the North Carolina Civil Liberties Union file a class action lawsuit against Antlers Tavern in Blowing Rock for violating the Civil Rights Act of 1964 after being refused entry based on their race and other related incidents.

1978: The Town of Boone begins tapping water from Appalachian State’s independent water supply after a severe drought.

1978: Bill Murray, Mother’s Finest, and Dixie Dregs perform at Homecoming.

1978: Student Government Association offers Legal Aid service to students.

1978: Yosef is prohibited by the Occupational Health and Safety Administration from firing his rifle inside buildings and without protective gear due to the risk of potential hearing damage.

1979: The Department of Energy and NASA build a windmill at Howard’s Knob.

1979: The Appalachian Gay Awareness Association attempts to establish a constitution. The Student Government approves the constitution, and the campus holds a special referendum where 8% of student body votes 3 to 1 against it. Chancellor Wey approves the constitution, making AGAA an official campus organization in June.

1979: Conrad Stadium is rebuilt.

1979: Students hold an anti-nuke rally in April.

1979: Herbert Walter Wey retires as chancellor; Cratis Williams becomes interim chancellor

1979: United Antenna Service offers HBO in Boone.

1979: Gymnastics Team disbands in the Fall after Bill Clinebell resigns as their coach.

1979: John E. Thomas becomes chancellor.

1979: Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, speaks at Appalachian State in October.

1979: Duke Ellington Band performs on campus.

1979: Students hold demonstration against Iran hostage crisis. An estimated 350 students participate.

 

 

 

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